Fraud & Identity Theft » Fraud Alert

Fraud Alert

If you believe you’ve been a victim of fraud, you can attach a fraud alert to your credit report. There are two types of fraud alerts: initial security alerts and extended security alerts.

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Initial Security Alerts

When you fear fraud may have occurred, but aren’t sure, an initial security alert warns lenders that you may have been a fraud victim, and asks them to take extra precautions before granting a line of credit in your name.

Extended Security Alerts

If fraud actually does occur, you can ask for an extended security alert, which is also known as a victim statement. This is a higher level of fraud alert that generally requires a police report or victim statement. With this type of alert on your credit report, lenders will need you to verify your identity via phone before they approve any new credit application associated with your name and credit file.